Doctors flee Wa regional hospital

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Email this to someone

A former Medical Officer at the Wa Regional Hospital, Dr. Amoo Acheampong is calling on the Ministry of Health and the Ghana Health Services to urgently launch investigations into the exodus of doctors from the facility.

According to Dr. Amoo, failure to do so would put the Regional Hospital in danger, because apart from the Medical Director of the Regional Hospital, Dr. Aduko Amiah a Consultant Surgeon, who is due for retirement in June 2015, the hospital has some six House Officers who would be leaving at the end of March 2015, and some visiting Doctors.

According to him, the rate of stealing at Medical Personnel Residential Houses at Jahan and Airstrip Medical Residential areas was de-motivating the doctors to stay at the facility.

Dr. Amoo said he became a victim to the situation when on October 20, 2014; robbers broke into his bungalow five days after occupying it at Airstrip area leading to the loss of his hard drive, surgical instruments and personal belongings.

After the incident, the hospital authority arranged and detailed security men to the residential areas, but those security men stopped coming a few days later. The only Gynecologist Specialist at the hospital, Dr. Dalatu Aziz was also burgled.

He subsequently resigned from the Ghana Health Services in a letter dated January 28, 2015, which was addressed to the Director General Ghana Health Service, the Regional Director of Health Services , Upper West and the Medical Director, Regional Hospital Wa.

Dr. Dalatu Aziz’s resignation took effect from March, 2015, leaving the facility with Dr. Amiah and the six House Officers, with the support of some visiting Medical Consultants. When contacted, the Medical Director of Wa Regional Hospital confirmed the spate of burglary and stealing at the two residential areas of Medical officers, but pleaded that issues about the hospital are normally handled by the Regional Health Director, Dr. Abdullai Fogor.

Dr. Abdullai Fogor, on his part, told The Chronicle that the Directorate and the Hospital Authority with the Regional Security Council were doing their possible best to help curb the situation, adding that currently the security has been beefed up in the two residential areas.

On the issue of poorly furnished consulting rooms, Dr. Abdullai Fogor indicated that Dr. Amoo Acheampong should have resorted to the internal resolution process in dealing with the issues raised if indeed they are true, instead of running to the Press.

He said currently because of the National Health Insurance issue, there is lack of money to evenly furnish every department of the hospital at once and that management has to prioritize some key areas or department and manage the situation till the situation improved.

The Chronicle chanced upon a letter written through the Regional Health Directorate to the Regional Minister of Upper West requesting for security assistance due to the alarming spate of burglary and stealing at Medical Personnel Residential Houses at Jahan and Airstrip Medical Residential areas.

The letter recalled some years back, when the Cuban Medical Brigade fell victim to the canker and that led to an arrangement with the police to provide them with 24-hour security.

According to the letter a lot of burglary activities have been carried out in the two residential areas in 2012 and 2013 including the residences of the former Deputy Director (Public Health) and the Regional Hospital Accountant.

The letter stated that in the year 2014 several attempts were made on staff residential houses, with the most alarming one which occurred on October 20, 2014 in which the residence of the newly posted Doctor, Dr. Amoo Acheampong was burgled in less than five days of occupying the bungalow.

Dr. Abdullai Fogor emphasized the effort to help improve security at the residential areas, urging that everybody must assist by being security conscious because all are vulnerable to robbery.

MMT boils over moves to sack workers

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Email this to someone

A 26-year-old pregnant wife simply identified as Onyiyechi has been arrested by the Lagos state police command for stabbing her husband to death following an argument over the presidential candidates in Saturday’s general election at their home in Ejigbo on Sunday March 29th.The Tema District Council of Labour (TDCL) has given government two reduce fuel prices and fix the current “dumsor problems without further excuses.” The Tema District Council of Labour (TDCL) has given government two reduce fuel prices and fix the current “dumsor problems without further excuses.”

Fire Service records 1, 539 fire outbreaks

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Email this to someone

A 26-year-old pregnant wife simply identified as Onyiyechi has been arrested by the Lagos state police command for stabbing her husband to death following an argument over the presidential candidates in Saturday’s general election at their home in Ejigbo on Sunday March 29th. The Tema District Council of Labour (TDCL) has given government two reduce fuel prices and fix the current “dumsor problems without further excuses.”

Tribunal to rule on suspension of Ghana’s offshore operations in April 2015

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Email this to someone

Legal arguments on whether or not oil exploration activities should be suspended on Ghana’s offshore until the final determination of a maritime dispute between it and Cote d’Ivoire has ended.

Subsequently, the registrar of the Tribunal for the International Law of the Sea (ITLOS) in Hamburg, Germany, Mr Philippe Gautier, has given both countries up to April 2, 2015, to submit corrections on their oral submissions to the tribunal.

According to Mr Boualem Bouguetaia, the President of the panel of judges, which heard application for and against preliminary measures against Ghana, the decision of the tribunal, would be delivered in April 2015.

He, however, did not indicate the exact date but said it will be communicated to the parties soon.

He also thanked the parties for putting up a spirited fight.

Prior to the end of the proceedings, the lead international lawyer for Ghana, Professor Philippe Sands, drew the tribunal’s attention to Cote d’Ivoire’s circumvention of the rules of the tribunal when it (Cote d’Ivoire) decided to attach a fresh document to its case during the hearing on Sunday.

The tribunal told Prof. Sands it had taken note of the issue.

A major project to be affected should Cote d’Ivoire’s call for all activities to cease on the disputed boundary be upheld, is the exploration and exploitation works on the Tweneboah-Enyera-Ntoumme (TEN) project being operated by Tullow Oil Plc and its partners.

Earlier at the tribunal’s sitting in Hamburg on Monday, lawyers for both countries made a case for and against the suspension of exploration activities on the disputed area.

Cote d’Ivoire accused Ghana of attempting to prejudice the tribunal’s upcoming decision by going into the merit of the case with volumes of documents and witness statements but Ghana faulted its neighbour for departing from the law, making baseless accusations, being inconsistent and failing to produce witnesses and expert evidence.

Ghana also reminded Cote d’Ivoire of its lack of consistency and merit in filing for preliminary measures.

The absence of credible data and evidence from Cote d’Ivoire, according to Ghana, was due to Cote d’Ivoire’s handicap in producing factual documents to back its case.

Ghana also reminded Cote d’Ivoire of its failure to challenge the evidence of its technical witnesses which according to Ghana, summed up to shred Cote d’Ivoire’s case.

The Attorney-General and Minister of Jusstice, Mrs Marietta Brew Appiah-Opong led Ghana’s team while the Minister of Petroleum and Energy of Cote d’Ivoire, Mr Adama Toungara led the Ivorian team.

Cote d’Ivoire, which was given the first opportunity to present its closing address prayed the tribunal to grant its application on the grounds that it would suffer irreparable damage should Ghana be allowed to continue with exploration activities on the disputed boundary.

One of Cote d’Ivoire’s lawyers, Mr Adama Kamara, expressed regret at Ghana’s decision to argue on the merits of the case at the preliminary stages and insisted the two countries had always questioned the delimitation of their boundaries.

He said “the issue on maritime boundaries between the two countries remains an open subject but Ghana says it is closed and there is no contention.”

According to him the two countries never agreed on delimitation of their maritime boundaries and argued that the equidistance line produced by Ghana was “approximate,” and added “we will advance the technical argument later.”

Mr Kamara made a u-turn and indicted Petroci, the agency vested with Cote d’Ivoire’s hydrocarbons and said the maps produced by Petroci could not be used to illustrate the official position of Cote d’Ivoire.

Sir Michael Wood, one of Cote d’Ivoire’s international lawyers, accused Ghana of attempting to prejudice the case with its advanced arguments on the merit of the case.

He said Ghana had relied on fait accompli by ignoring Cote d’Ivoire’s protest while his counterpart, Mr Michael Pitron, also indicated Cote d’Ivoire did not produce witnesses and expert opinions because the merit of the case was yet to be tackled.

“Ghana is bent on hegemony. We have voiced our concerns since 1988 and that is why we are here,” Mr Pitron added.

Prof. Alain Pellet, urged the tribunal to protect the rights of both countries as enshrined in international law but accused Ghana of acting as if it was on “home ground,” and prayed the tribunal to stop Ghana from continuing with exploration activities until the matter is resolved.

He also urged the chamber to order Ghana to send periodic reports to the Chamber on steps being taken to protect the marine environment in the disputed area.

Making a case for his country, Cote d’Ivoire’s Minister of Petroleum and Energy, Mr Adama Toungara, said Cote d’Ivoire has never recognised what he termed “the so-called customary equidistance line.”

According to him, Ghana was imposing the equidistance line on Cote d’Ivoire and, therefore, urged the tribunal to stop Ghana from acting unilaterally.

The Attorney-General in her closing remarks noted “Cote d’Ivoire has done nothing to displace the fact that Ghana has a solid case for entitlement to the area it newly claims that was recognised in mutual petroleum concession practice over many years and backed by principles of domestic and international law.

She accused Cote d’Ivoire of making unjustifiable and glaring omissions in both its written and oral submissions adding “that is not good enough.”

Mrs Appiah-Opong also indicated how Cote d’Ivoire had been totally silent on how Ghana’s rights would be protected should Ghana win in the long run, and oil production, had been stopped by the tribunal at the preliminary stage.

Cote d’Ivoire had accused Ghana of hegemony and acting unilaterally but Mrs Appiah-Opong reminded it that its first President had recognised the boundary between the two countries decades ago.

She said it was long after oil companies had spent millions to drill wells and discovered oil that Cote d’Ivoire began to stake a claim.

Responding to Cote d’Ivoire’s accusation that Ghana’s marine environment had been polluted – the Attorney-General said “the environmental competence allegations made by Cote d’Ivoire and the claim of rights relating to environmental information are manifestly unsustainable.”

She also touched on the competence of the contractors operating on Ghana’s oil fields and said Ghana had expert evidence to back its assertion that Cote d’Ivoire had no basis to accuse Ghana of environmental pollution.

Mrs Appiah-Opong argued that there was no urgency to the matter, Ghana had invested millions and Cote d’Ivoire had nothing to lose should work be stopped on the disputed area.

According to her Ghana on the other hand would suffer unquantifiable loss should its opponent’s application be upheld adding “Cote d’Ivoire’s attempt to prevent the continuation of the existing activities is likely to seriously aggravate this dispute and make its resolution much harder.

In short, the measures sought by Cote d’Ivoire would guarantee disproportionate, irreparable harm to Ghana, they would aggravate this dispute and they would cause irremediable injustice.”

Arguing further, Mrs Appiah-Opong noted that Cote d’Ivoire had not acted in accordance with the principles of comity between nations in this particular case in “attempting on the basis to of the very thin material it has put forward to halt a significant part of one of Ghana’s vital industries.

Cote d’Ivoire made this application as though the events from 1960 to 2009 had not occurred, as though the entire history began only in 2009 or late 2011, when it made its new claims public. With great respect, that is not a reasonable approach. Cote d’Ivoire acted as it did for more than four decades as did Ghana, and it is not now entitled to disregard this.”

“Ghana takes this case and our international legal obligations seriously, particularly when subject to unjustifiable attack. We have filed detailed and extensive written evidence.

We have offered witness testimony, none of which has been challenged. We have brought a substantial delegation to this tribunal covering the many areas touched by this application. This approach has not been reciprocated either in the written submissions or at this hearing,” Mrs Appiah-Opong emphasised.

She submitted further “this should be one of the straightforward cases that this Tribunal has had to decide. It is, we respectfully submit, clear that the provisional measures sought should be refused.

On behalf of Ghana, I therefore, formally request that the application for provisional measures be declined. A formal written submission pursuant to Article 75 will be provided.”

Mrs Appiah-Opong thanked the judges and staff of ITLOS for indulging both parties at such short period.

Making a case for Ghana, the lead counsel for Ghana’s international legal team, Prof. Sands said Ghana had been prudent and consistent with Cote d’Ivoire for more than 40 years on the issue of maritime boundary demarcation.

He questioned why Cote d’Ivoire had abandoned its first President’s decree recognising the maritime boundary with Ghana.

“There was no formal agreement but there was understanding and no conflict. It was only in 2009 that the situation changed behind the scene after money had been spent by Ghana and oil had been found,” he noted.

He accused Cote d’Ivoire of coming up with three different and inconsistent mapping on the disputed area and said Ghana had been consistent with its position.”

Still on the maps, Prof. Sands questioned “are they claiming Meridian 1, Meridian 2 bisector line or a new line they constructed weeks ago? There is no specification on their claims. We take that as a concession. They recognise the implausibility of their claims.”

Reacting to Cote d’Ivoire’s disowning of Petroci, Prof. Sands told the tribunal Petroci was a government entity and not a private entity as was being portrayed by Cote d’Ivoire.

He said the Ivorians perhaps decided not to bring Petroci to the tribunal because Petroci’s data recognised Ghana’s position.

“Petroci is a government entity but now Cote d’Ivoire is disowning it. That is a sign of desperation,” Prof Sands opined.

Cote d’Ivoire attempted to dismiss Ghana’s witness statement but Prof. Sands maintained they could not do that because they had failed to cross examine Ghana’s witness thereby indicating the evidence had been unchallenged by Cote d’Ivoire – which also failed to call witnesses.

Responding to Mr Toungara’s earlier claim that he (Toungara) had had 40 years experience in Cote d’Ivoire’s oil industry and was, therefore, a witness, Prof. Sands replied “he is not a witness. He is an Agent for Cote d’Ivoire.”

Counsel proceeded to undo Cote d’Ivoire’s closing remarks and even accused them of using “unorthodox” means to introduce fresh documents into the case in clear violation of the tribunal’s rules.

International Women’s Day climaxed with health walk

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Email this to someone

Accra during the weekend to climax the month-long celebration of the International Women’s Day which was observed on March 8.

The health walk, aimed at drawing public attention to the need to continue efforts to empower women in the Ghanaian society, was organised by UNAIDS in partnership with Strategic Communications Africa Limited (Stratcomm Africa), Ghana AIDS Commission and the Accra Metropolitan Assembly.

Participants in the walk included women from various associations, human rights advocates, the media and other members from the general public.

The walk also raised awareness of women’s empowerment issues, including sexual and reproductive health issues. The programme began at 6:30am from the Osu Police Station and proceeded through the John Evans Atta-Mills High street, ending at Mantse Agbona in James Town.

At the end of the walk, a forum, drama and music on women empowerment and HIV and AIDS prevention and treatment were organised. Involving women in development

Participants also had the opportunity to undergo HIV testing and counselling, access condoms and information, education and communication materials on various empowerment issues.

Speaking at the forum, the Chief Executive Officer of StratComm Africa, Mrs Esther Cobbah, said women needed to be empowered to participate largely in the running of the economy of the country as well as the development agenda.

According to her, if women were able to manage the home with daily money (chop money) given to them by their partners well, then they should be involved in the management of the economy of the country as well.

“I believe that if they are included in the management of the economy, they will manage it well and the economy will be nourished, enriched and energised,” she added.

When the right environment is created for women, Mrs Cobbah said, they excel, and therefore asked that the right environment should be designed to cater for the development of women.

The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Country representative, Ms Christine Evans-Klock, commended Ghana for the successes chalked in women empowerment and gender equality over the years.

However, she said more needed to be done to promote women and girls’ rights and empower them.

Muhammadu Buhari wins Nigeria’s presidential election

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Email this to someone

Nigeria’s election commission has declared Muhammadu Buhari the winner of the country’s bitterly contested presidential election, in a vote marred by confusion, arguments and violence.

Al Jazeera’s Yvonne Ndege, reporting from the capital Abuja, said the election commission made the announcement after nearly all votes had been tallied.

Incumbent President Goodluck Jonathan immediately conceded defeat and congratulated Buhari on his victory, the APC said.

According to the Reuters news agency, Buhari’s APC won by 2.1 million votes, with 15.4 million votes versus 13.3 for Jonathan and the PDP.

Victory for former military ruler Buhari marks the first time in Nigeria’s history that an opposition party has democratically taken control of the country from the ruling party.

Lai Mohammed, the spokesman for the APC, told the AFP news agency that his party had declared victory after pulling ahead in the votes.

“This is the first time the opposition has voted a government out of power in Nigeria’s history,” he said.

Asked if he was confident of having won after the APC claimed victory, Buhari said: “I am very confident.”

To win the election, Buhari had needed to win more than 50 percent of the total votes nationally – and take at least 25 percent of the vote in two-thirds of the states.

The 72-year-old built an early lead in northern states dominated by the mainly Muslim, Hausa-Fulani ethnic group of which he is a member.

Incumbent President Goodluck Jonathan, whose five years in office have been plagued by corruption scandals and an insurgency by Boko Haram fighters, was trailing by around 500,000 votes before votes in pro-opposition areas were counted.

In the previous election, more than 800 people were killed in protests after Buhari was defeated by Buhari.

There was a brief protest by Jonathan’s Peoples Democratic Party (PDP) before the counting had resumed on Tuesday.

Former Niger Delta minister Godsday Orubebe accused elections chief Attahiru Jega of being “partial” and “selective”.

Orubebe claimed Jega had refused to investigate PDP complaints about big wins by Buhari in northern states but had launched a probe into claims by the APC of irregularities in Rivers.

Jega said later: “I don’t believe that the allegations are substantial enough to require the cancellation or rescheduling of the elections in Rivers state. We will take the results.”

International observers gave broadly positive reactions to the conduct of the vote, despite late delivery of election materials and technical glitches with new voter authentication devices.

Nigeria’s Transition Monitoring Group, which had observers across the country, said: “These issues did not systematically disadvantage any candidate or party.”

Akufo-Addo congratulates president-elect Buhari

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Email this to someone

I join well-wishers in the rest of Africa and across the world to extend warm congratulations to the APC presidential candidate, General Muhammadu Buhari, on his decisive victory in the March 28, 29 Nigerian presidential election, thus becoming the next President of the Federal Republic.

Through the peaceful exercise of their sovereign and democratic right to elect their own leaders, the people of Nigeria have strengthened the frontiers of democracy for all other African countries to emulate.

This is the first time, in Nigeria’s history, that one democratically elected government has been voted out for another, and that a sitting President has been rejected at the polls. This change, after 16 years of the Fourth Republic, should go a long way to enhancing the quality of competitive governance in Nigeria. It has reinforced the democratic notion that the people have the power to change governments.

President Goodluck Jonathan is to be commended for graciously conceding defeat, thereby laying to rest any lingering suspicion and anxiety about the fate of Nigeria in the aftermath of the elections.

By their exemplary conduct, both outgoing President Jonathan and his successor have reinforced the resilience of Nigeria’s democracy, and demonstrated to the entire world that politics in Africa can be positively competitive, when conducted on the basis of time-honoured principles of transparency, fairness and equal opportunity.

I hope that the determination and perseverance shown over the years by General Buhari, evident in this victory, which is his 4th attempt at the Presidency, will result in him bringing his wealth of experience, as a military ruler and subsequently as an acknowledged democrat, to the fore in delivering unity, security, progress and prosperity to the Nigerian people.

I also hope that the President-elect would continue in the stead of past Nigerian leaders and deepen further the friendship that exists between Nigeria and Ghana, which has been based on a shared agenda of stability, security, development and prosperity.

Warm congratulations once again to the President-Elect, General Muhammadu Buhari, and best wishes for his success as he prepares to take up the huge responsibilities and challenges of the high office of President of the Federal Republic of Nigeria.

……signed……

Nana Akufo-Addo

2016 NPP Presidential Candidate, Ghana

Ghana opens defence against Ivory Coast in oil exploration dispute

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Email this to someone

A 26-year-old pregnant wife simply identified as Onyiyechi has been arrested by the Lagos state police command for stabbing her husband to death following an argument over the presidential candidates in Saturday’s general election at their home in Ejigbo on Sunday March 29th.The Tema District Council of Labour (TDCL) has given government two reduce fuel prices and fix the current “dumsor problems without further excuses.”

Nigeria boils: ‘INEC boss is tribalistic, partial, compromised; We will not accept results’

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Email this to someone

The incumbent party in Nigeria, PDP has said it will not accept the results of the recently held elections.

Its agent at the collation centre Tuesday morning launched an acerbic attack on the head of the country’s Independent National Electoral Commission (INEC), Attahiru Jega, accusing him of bias.

According to the PDP agent, who is a former Minister of the Federal Republic of Nigeria, Mr Jega gave audience to a protest raised by the APC as far as results in Rivers state were concerned, but has swept similar protests raised by the PDP in four states under the carpet.

“Mr Chairman APC protested to you and you sent a delegation to Rivers state to see what is happening there…

“Mr Chairman we are beginning to see that you are very very selective. You are getting very very partial.

“Mr Chairman we have lost confidence in what you are doing. If we can send a protest to you and you cannot take up that protest then why are we here because the essence of we sending any protest to you is to enable you to look into the matter and see whether it has merits or demerits.

“But when the APC brought their own you went all out to send a delegation…We have complained about Kano, Katsina, Jigawa, Kaduna; you have not done anything. Mr Chairman we are not going to take that. We have lost confidence in you because you are partial, you are selective Mr Chairman.

“We don’t believe in you anymore, and we cannot go on the way you are going. You are compromised and we will not take it from you. Until something is done to our letters, until you do something the way you did with APC we will not continue with you.

“You are selective, you are tribalistic, you are partial…until something is done, we will not allow you to continue with this thing. Nigeria will not allow you do this. Every protest must be taken seriously,” the angry PDP agent said.

The collation has come to a standstill as a result of the angry outburst and protest by the PDP.

The BBC reports that partial results give ex-military ruler Muhammadu Buhari a substantial lead over the incumbent, President Goodluck Jonathan.

However, populous states such as Lagos and Rivers are yet to declare. With just over half of Nigeria’s states declared, Gen Buhari’s All Progressives Congress (APC) is ahead by some two million votes.

A victory for Gen Buhari would make President Jonathan the first incumbent in Nigeria to lose an election.

More results are due to be announced today. Nigeria’s election commission (INEC) suspended its declarations late on Monday night, after giving the results for 18 states and the capital Abuja.

President Jonathan’s Peoples Democratic Party (PDP) gained 6,488,210 votes and Gen Buhari’s APC party received 8,520,436 votes.

Judges vow to reconsider judgments handed to remand suspects

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Email this to someone

Contrary to popular belief, Lorem Ipsum is not simply random text. It has roots in a piece of classical Latin literature from 45 BC, making it over 2000 years old. Richard McClintock, a Latin professor at Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia, looked up one of the more obscure Latin words, consectetur, from a Lorem Ipsum passage, and going through the cites of the word in classical literature, discovered the undoubtable source. Lorem Ipsum comes from sections 1.10.32 and 1.10.33 of “de Finibus Bonorum et Malorum” (The Extremes of Good and Evil) by Cicero, written in 45 BC. This book is a treatise on the theory of ethics, very popular during the Renaissance. The first line of Lorem Ipsum, “Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet..”, comes from a line in section 1.10.32.

The president has arrived

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Email this to someone

Contrary to popular belief, Lorem Ipsum is not simply random text. It has roots in a piece of classical Latin literature from 45 BC, making it over 2000 years old. Richard McClintock, a Latin professor at Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia, looked up one of the more obscure Latin words, consectetur, from a Lorem Ipsum passage, and going through the cites of the word in classical literature, discovered the undoubtable source. Lorem Ipsum comes from sections 1.10.32 and 1.10.33 of “de Finibus Bonorum et Malorum” (The Extremes of Good and Evil) by Cicero, written in 45 BC. This book is a treatise on the theory of ethics, very popular during the Renaissance. The first line of Lorem Ipsum, “Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet..”, comes from a line in section 1.10.32.